The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860


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Nathaniel Paul visited Britain to raise funds for Wilberforce Settlement in Canada, but his successful challenge of Elliot Cresson, the American Colonization Society's agent, unwittingly showed how effective a black antislavery propagandist could be with the British public. Charles Lenox Remand, another freeborn black, while organizing local anti-slavery committees, learned that black abolitionists must avoid entanglement in the factional disputes of British anti-slavery.

Moses Grandy and Frederick Douglass discovered the special appeal that fugitive slaves, whether in person or through published narratives, had for British audiences eager for personal accounts of slavery. They also perceived that a successful tour needed accreditation by British anti-slavery officialdom. These considerations were the chart and compass of the anti-slavery tours which resourceful black abolitionists conducted until the end of the Civil War.

The introduction calls black abolitionist goals in Britain not only "welldefined ," but "broad and sophisticated. This required flexibility in undertaking tasks such as educating a poorly-informed British public about the everyday realities of slavery, discrediting the "contented slave thesis," explaining the intricate relation between the constitution and slavery, and convincing Britons to boycott slave-grown produce or to break ties with slave-holding American denominations.

But underlying this "ambitious assortment" of antislavery themes was the "consistent goal" of persuading the "British public to place its moral support behind the crusade to end American slavery.

ISBN 13: 9780781260831

The essay concludes that the black abolitionists' experience in Britain was a "counterpoint" to their lives in the Access options available:. Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide.

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ASALH - The Founders of Black History Month | Study the Year Journey

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. My Bondage and My Freedom.

Women's Slave Narratives. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Narrative of My Escape from Slavery. The Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave.

More Books by Carter G. Woodson

Slave Songs of the United States. Three Narratives of Slavery.

Stanford Libraries

Du Bois, to be awarded a doctorate in history from Harvard and the first person of enslaved parents to receive a PhD in history. While attending the Exposition of Negro Progress in Chicago in , which was organized to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of emancipation, Woodson founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. The organization was headquartered in Washington, D. The same year, Woodson established the Journal of Negro History its first issue was published in January , to give scholars, primarily African Americans and whites who wrote about black history, a vehicle in which to publish their research.

African American studies would not be fully accepted by mainstream historical journals until the s. Shufeldt, an anthropologist and noted paleontologist whose specialty was not people, but birds.

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The review suggests the climate of academia at the time and the difficulties Woodson faced in promoting black history. For instance, the Times quotes Shufeldt as arguing that the African American had never "contributed a single line to literature worth the printing; a single cog in the machine of invention; an idea to any science; or, in short, advanced civilization a single millimeter since the first Congo pair was placed on this soil.

Woodson developed an audience for his journal and books by traveling around the country and lecturing to African American organizations and institutions, women's clubs, fraternal associations, and civic groups. He also held annual meetings of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, and worked with schoolteachers and boards of education to promote the study of African American history. In he created the Associated Publishers, which was dedicated to issuing books by African American authors. In his overview of the black experience, The Negro in Our History, was published.

And in he orchestrated the annual celebration of Negro History Week in February, held in connection with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. In , the celebration was extended to a month, and has now evolved into Black History Month. In his work with schoolteachers, Woodson prepared curriculum materials and "Negro History Kits" to encourage the study of African American history.

An excellent fund-raiser, Woodson received major support from white philanthropists during the s and early in the s to support his program of research and publication.

Taylor, Charles Wesley, and Luther Porter Jackson to conduct research and publish books and articles on all aspects of African American life and history. In addition, he traveled throughout the United States and Europe to collect primary source materials on blacks that he placed in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress, where they remain available for scholarly use today.

Less well known are Woodson's activities in civil rights organizations. Philip Randolph's Friends of Negro Freedom. During the s and s, Woodson backed other radical and leftist black organizations, such as the New Negro Alliance and its "Don't Buy Where You Can't Work" campaign, which was a reaction to the exclusion of African American laborers from white-owned businesses in large urban areas.

He also supported the radical National Negro Congress and attended its meetings. Woodson died in Washington, D.

Carter G. Woodson: The Miseducation of the Negro - Book Review

Financial hardships plagued the organization throughout the second half of the twentieth century.

The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860 The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860
The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860 The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860
The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860 The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860
The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860 The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860
The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860 The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860
The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860 The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860
The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860 The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860
The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860 The Mind of the Negro As Reflected in Letters During the Crisis 1800-1860

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